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Vlieseline - Softline Fusible Interfacing 3 (heavy weight) H410/316

Vlieseline - Softline Fusible Interfacing 3 (heavy weight) H410/316
Vlieseline - Softline Fusible Interfacing 3 (heavy weight) H410/316
Vlieseline - Softline Fusible Interfacing 3 (heavy weight) H410/316
Vlieseline - Softline Fusible Interfacing 3 (heavy weight) H410/316
Vlieseline - Softline Fusible Interfacing 3 (heavy weight) H410/316
Vlieseline - Softline Fusible Interfacing 3 (heavy weight) H410/316
Vlieseline - Softline Fusible Interfacing 3 (heavy weight) H410/316

This heavyweight, fusible interfacing has stabilising threads along the grain to help soft fabrics retain their shape.

Use with:

  • light weight fabric if you are looking for a really really stiff finish.
  • medium weight fabric where you need a crisp finish or extra strength.
  • heavy weight fabrics if you are looking to increase control without adding too much stiffness.

Once fused the fabric can be washed upto 40 degrees (unless the fabric care instructions are lower).

90cm wide, order in cms or mtrs, the more you order the longer your piece of interfacing will get, or opt for one of our great value pre-cut mini rolls:

  • Save 10% when you order a 5mtr roll.
  • Save 15% when you order a 10mtr roll.
  • Save 25% when you order a 25mtr roll.

This guide is designed to help you choose the right interfacing for your fabric when sewing with non-stretchy (woven) fabrics.

The Science Bit!

Fabrics are made by weaving cotton threads together in a criss-cross pattern. The way each fabric is woven, the type and weight of the threads used, and the way you cut the fabric affects each fabric’s drape and stretchiness.

Interfacing disrupts drape. By understanding the different types of interfacing and their impact on your fabric, you can use this disruption to your advantage.

Decision 1 - Fusible or Sew In?

Interfacing can be sew-in or fusible. We recommend using fusible interfacing as it saves you a step in the sewing process, but if you want to retain the true drape of your fabric you will need to use sew-in interfacing.

Decision 2 - Woven v Non-Woven?

When you fuse non-woven interfacings on to your fabric all the little holes between the woven threads are filled in, the fabric becomes stiffer and the fabric’s natural drape is lost.

If you are only working on a small section of fabric, such as around buttonholes or on a collar, the loss of drape can be unnoticeable, or is the desired effect – no one wants a cuff that drapes, you want it to stand stiffly at the end of the sleeve, and the same is often true when making cushion covers, purses and bags, you use interfacing because you want your project to look smoother and stiffer.

In situations such as these, if the interfacing is going to end up between layers of fabric, or inside a cushion cover, there is no need to pay more for woven interfacing.

Woven interfacing comes into its own when you:

  • want to retain the drape of your fabric,
  • will not be covering the interfacing up with more fabric (non-woven interfacing can be damaged more easily and is less attractive),
  • need to add a high level of strength through your interfacing – in a book bag for example.

Woven interfacings are created in the same way as fabric and so have their own natural drape. When you fuse these to your main fabric you retain that drape.

They are stronger than non-woven interfacings, are harder to damage, and are pleasing to the eye.

Decision 3 - Getting the Weight Right

Non-woven interfacing is sold in three weights, lightweight, medium weight and heavy weight.

There are two factors to consider when choosing the right one for your project:

  • The weight of your fabric – lighter weight fabrics such as silk, should be used with lightweight interfacing, regular cottons should be used with medium weight interfacing, home decor weight fabrics need heavyweight interfacing.
  • How much control you need – although you should stick to the right weight for your fabric, you can move up the interfacing weights in order to increase the level of stiffness you want to add to your fabric, or down the range to minimise the impact of the interfacing.
Is There Anything Else to Consider?
  • If you are working with stretchy fabrics, such as jersey or knit, you need to use interfacings designed for that purpose - H609 is the non-woven alternative to those above and G770 is the woven version - both available in store.
  • If you are looking for a padded feel take a look at our range of fusible fleeces.
  • If you are making a waistband, belt or handles, check out waistshaper.
  • If you just need enough interfacing to reinforce the edge of a pocket, a button hole or neckline, consider using one of our range of interfacing tapes.

Lightweight (H180/308)

  1. Place the interfacing on your fabric with the coated side (bumpy side) of the interfacing facing the back of the fabric.
  2. With the iron set to silk/wool and using dry heat, glide the iron firmly 5-6 times very slowly over the interfacing, so that each area receives approx. 8 seconds of heat. 
  3. Allow the pieces to cool flat for about 20 minutes, so that the adhesive can set properly.  
Mediumweight (G405/315)
  1. Place the interfacing on your fabric with the coated side (bumpy side) of the interfacing facing the back of the fabric. Cover the entire area with a damp ironing cloth.
  2. Set your iron to silk/wool and then press each area for about 12 seconds, moving the iron up and down rather than from side to side.
  3. Allow the pieces to cool flat for about 30 minutes, so that the adhesive can set properly.
Heavyweight (H410/316)
  1. Important: the thread along the grain of the interfacing must follow the grain of the fabric.  If you are using a sewing pattern, lay your pattern pieces out on the interfacing in the same direction as you did for your fabric to ensure you achieve this.
  2. Place the interfacing on your fabric with the coated side (bumpy side) on the wrong side of the fabric. Cover the entire area with a damp cloth.
  3. Set your iron to silk/wool and then press each area for about 12 seconds, moving the iron up and down rather than from side to side.
  4. Allow the pieces to cool flat for about 30 minutes, so that the adhesive can set properly.

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